Why is my road always the last one plowed after a snowstorm?

The road commission organizes snow-plowing operations to service the most heavily traveled roadways first during and after a winter storm. The road commission starts with 370 miles of State Trunk line first. About 378 miles of county primary roads and certain high traffic local roads in the urban area are plowed next. After those roads are passable, crews move on to clear local paved roads throughout the county. Typically, local subdivision streets and rural gravel roads are cleared after all other higher traffic roads. 

Although our crews may begin plowing/salting several hours before the morning peak traffic, and continue operations into the night, extended winter storms or continuing winds may require crews to continually plow the main high traffic roads and prevent them from reaching subdivision streets or rural gravel roads the first day. The road commission operates with an emergency crew around the clock when necessary.

Show All Answers

1. How do I submit a service request?
2. Where does the Road Commission get its operating funds?
3. Does increased driving mean more gas tax revenue?
4. What causes potholes?
5. My vehicle was damaged due to the condition of a road - is the Road Commission going to pay for it?
6. How can I get my road paved?
7. Can I fill in the ditch and plant trees in front of my property?
8. Why do you spread all that tar and gravel on the paved roads? There was nothing wrong with the road and now it is a mess?
9. How can I get my gravel road graded?
10. How can I get chloride applied to my gravel road?
11. Why is my road always the last one plowed after a snowstorm?
12. Why do the snow plows push the snow back into my driveway after I shovel?
13. What should be kept in mind when shoveling/plowing driveways?
14. A road commission snow plow knocked down my mailbox, what now?
15. What are weight restrictions?
16. Is the Muskegon County Road Commission responsible for state highways?